University of Iowa Health Care

Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences

EyeRounds.org

Canalicular Lacerations

Contributors: Kenten Kingsbury;  Spenser J. Morton, MD; and Audrey C. Ko, MD

Photographer: Audrey C. Ko, MD

January 29, 2018

 

Canalicular lacerations are commonly caused by trauma to the medial aspect of the upper or lower eyelids, which contain the superior and inferior lacrimal canaliculi. The lacrimal canaliculi are prone to damage from lacerations due to their lack of support from the tarsal plates of the eyelids. The accumulation of scar tissue due to unrepaired canaliculi or inflammation may cause the canalicular system to become obstructed, which may cause epiphora, or excessive watering of the eye. Treatment for canalicular lacerations is surgical repair via anastomosis and stenting of the lacerated canaliculus with a monocanalicular or bicanalicular stent [1]. 

A probe is inserted into the punctum to reveal the lacerated end of the distal canaliculus. 

Figure 1: A probe is inserted into the punctum to reveal the lacerated end of the distal canaliculus. 

The proximal lacerated end of the canaliculus (asterisk) is present deep within the medial canthus.  

Figure 2: The proximal lacerated end of the canaliculus (asterisk) is present deep within the medial canthus.  

Photograph demonstrating a visible bicanalicular silicone stent (arrow) after repair and stenting of canalicular laceration.  

Figure 3: Photograph demonstrating a visible bicanalicular silicone stent (arrow) after repair and stenting of canalicular laceration.  


Contributor: Andrew Doan, MD, PhD

February 8, 2008

 

Lower lid laceration medial to the lower lid canalicular system.

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last updated: 02/08/2008; addition made 01/29/2018
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